Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy

Food waste is a significant contemporary issue in the UK, with substantial environmental, social and economic costs to the nation. Whilst efforts to reduce food waste are laudable, a significant proportion of food and drink manufacturer waste is unavoidable. On the one hand, there is a drive from in...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Jamie Stone, Guillermo Garcia-Garcia, Shahin Rahimifard
Format: Default Article
Published: 2019
Subjects:
Online Access:https://hdl.handle.net/2134/38197
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
id rr-article-9561290
record_format Figshare
spelling rr-article-95612902019-06-26T00:00:00Z Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy Jamie Stone (1257411) Guillermo Garcia-Garcia (1253295) Shahin Rahimifard (1247889) Mechanical engineering not elsewhere classified Food waste valorisation Sustainability Cost-benefit analysis Mechanical Engineering not elsewhere classified Food waste is a significant contemporary issue in the UK, with substantial environmental, social and economic costs to the nation. Whilst efforts to reduce food waste are laudable, a significant proportion of food and drink manufacturer waste is unavoidable. On the one hand, there is a drive from industry to reclaim as much value from this waste as possible, for example, by conversion to valuable products in what is known as “valorisation”. At the same time, growing social and legislative pressures mean that any attempts to valorise food waste must be performed in a sustainable manner. However, for every company and its specific food wastes, there will be multiple valorisation possibilities and few tools exist that allow food and drink manufacturers to identify which is most profitable and sustainable for them. Such a decision would need to not only consider environmental, social and economic performance, but also how ready the technology is and how well it aligns with that company's strategy. In response, this paper develops and presents a hybrid framework that guides a company in modelling the volumes/seasonality of its wastes, identifying potential valorisation options and selecting appropriate indicators for environmental, social and economic performance as well as technological maturity and alignment with company goals. The framework guides users in analyzing economic and environmental performance using Cost-Benefit Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment respectively. The results can then be ranked alongside those for social performance, technological maturity and alignment with company goals using a weighted sum model variant of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis to facilitate easy visual comparison. This framework is demonstrated in the form of a case study with a major UK fruit consolidator to identify the optimal strategy for managing their citrus waste. Possibilities identified included sale of imperfect but still edible waste via wholesale at a significantly reduced profit and the investment in facilities to extract higher value pectin from the same waste stream using a microwave assisted pectin extraction process. Results suggest that continued sale of waste to wholesale markets is currently the most beneficial in terms of economic viability and environmental performance, but that in the medium to long term, the projected growth in the market for pectin suggests this could become the most viable strategy. 2019-06-26T00:00:00Z Text Journal contribution 2134/38197 https://figshare.com/articles/journal_contribution/Development_of_a_pragmatic_framework_to_help_food_and_drink_manufacturers_select_the_most_sustainable_food_waste_valorisation_strategy/9561290 CC BY 4.0
institution Loughborough University
collection Figshare
topic Mechanical engineering not elsewhere classified
Food waste valorisation
Sustainability
Cost-benefit analysis
Mechanical Engineering not elsewhere classified
spellingShingle Mechanical engineering not elsewhere classified
Food waste valorisation
Sustainability
Cost-benefit analysis
Mechanical Engineering not elsewhere classified
Jamie Stone
Guillermo Garcia-Garcia
Shahin Rahimifard
Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
description Food waste is a significant contemporary issue in the UK, with substantial environmental, social and economic costs to the nation. Whilst efforts to reduce food waste are laudable, a significant proportion of food and drink manufacturer waste is unavoidable. On the one hand, there is a drive from industry to reclaim as much value from this waste as possible, for example, by conversion to valuable products in what is known as “valorisation”. At the same time, growing social and legislative pressures mean that any attempts to valorise food waste must be performed in a sustainable manner. However, for every company and its specific food wastes, there will be multiple valorisation possibilities and few tools exist that allow food and drink manufacturers to identify which is most profitable and sustainable for them. Such a decision would need to not only consider environmental, social and economic performance, but also how ready the technology is and how well it aligns with that company's strategy. In response, this paper develops and presents a hybrid framework that guides a company in modelling the volumes/seasonality of its wastes, identifying potential valorisation options and selecting appropriate indicators for environmental, social and economic performance as well as technological maturity and alignment with company goals. The framework guides users in analyzing economic and environmental performance using Cost-Benefit Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment respectively. The results can then be ranked alongside those for social performance, technological maturity and alignment with company goals using a weighted sum model variant of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis to facilitate easy visual comparison. This framework is demonstrated in the form of a case study with a major UK fruit consolidator to identify the optimal strategy for managing their citrus waste. Possibilities identified included sale of imperfect but still edible waste via wholesale at a significantly reduced profit and the investment in facilities to extract higher value pectin from the same waste stream using a microwave assisted pectin extraction process. Results suggest that continued sale of waste to wholesale markets is currently the most beneficial in terms of economic viability and environmental performance, but that in the medium to long term, the projected growth in the market for pectin suggests this could become the most viable strategy.
format Default
Article
author Jamie Stone
Guillermo Garcia-Garcia
Shahin Rahimifard
author_facet Jamie Stone
Guillermo Garcia-Garcia
Shahin Rahimifard
author_sort Jamie Stone (1257411)
title Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
title_short Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
title_full Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
title_fullStr Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
title_full_unstemmed Development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
title_sort development of a pragmatic framework to help food and drink manufacturers select the most sustainable food waste valorisation strategy
publishDate 2019
url https://hdl.handle.net/2134/38197
_version_ 1756507112840626176