Assessing the contribution of out of school hours learning sports activities to sports participation by black, asian and minority ethnic pupils

There has been long standing concern amongst researchers and policy makers to ensure opportunities reach all pupils, including pupils from BAME backgrounds. This research looked at identifying the extent to which, and strategies through which, the participation of BAME pupils in OSHL school sport an...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Susie Brown, Tess Kay
Format: Default Book chapter
Published: 2010
Subjects:
Online Access:https://hdl.handle.net/2134/11896
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Description
Summary:There has been long standing concern amongst researchers and policy makers to ensure opportunities reach all pupils, including pupils from BAME backgrounds. This research looked at identifying the extent to which, and strategies through which, the participation of BAME pupils in OSHL school sport and club sport is being increased. The survey data collected showed that there was a clear and consistent gap between the participation levels of BAME pupils and white British pupils. The gap widened as OSHL activities moved off the school sites and were not directly organised by the school. Part of the reasons for the widening gap could relate to the most commonly mentioned barriers to increased participation by pupils from BAME which included a belief amongst parents that other subjects were more important than OSHL sports activities, family commitments and problems with transport. Successful strategies adopted to overcome barriers to participation among BAME pupils related to these issues. The small proportion of respondents who reported BAME pupil participation rates were higher than those of white British pupils were largely from where BAME pupils comprised more than 60 per cent of the school population. Over the next decade, the proportion of minority ethnic pupils will gradually increase moving towards one fifth of all secondary school pupils, with more schools having over 60 per cent.